Category Archives: hydrilla

Hydrilla: Fast-growing weed threatens to choke Lake Waccamaw

Staff photo by Cindy Burnham

Staff photo by Cindy Burnham

Source: Fayetteville Observer (NORTH CAROLINA) 06/17/2013

LAKE WACCAMAW – Nobody knew what it was at first, just an incredibly fast-spreading aquatic weed near the public boat ramp on Lake Waccamaw. Rob Emens visited the boat ramp in October and immediately knew that the plant fragments he saw floating in the water could be only one thing: the dreaded hydrilla.
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Area lakes could be threatened by noxious weeds

An effort was announced this week to encourage all lake residents and boaters to be on the lookout for an invasive, non-native aquatic weed that is a Godzilla among noxious aquatic weeds.Meet Hydrilla verticillata, water thyme, fast growing (an inch a day), and able to grow in a few inches of water or in 20 feet of water.
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Students join effort to stop spread of weeds

Currently, the North Carolina Aquatic Weed Control Program spends nearly $500000 a year on controlling aquatic invasive species.
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Specialists begin first round of treatment for Hydrilla

COLUMBUS COUNTY, NC – Aquatic specialists with SePRO began the first treatment for Hydrilla in Lake Waccamaw Tuesday. The specialists are spraying an aquatic herbicide called Sonar over about 1,000 acres of the 9,000 acre lake. The herbicide will sink to the bottom of the water and kill the Hydrilla.
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Hydrilla management plan working

Six years into waging a battle for Lake Wylie, the weed-eaters are taking it to the scourge. In 2007, Ibach called for hundreds, or even thousands, of weed-eating fish to combat the “menace.” The first load of 500 grass carp was released in May 2008.
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Community News: Austin releases more carp to fight invasive weed

The city of Austin released 9,000 sterile Asian grass carp into Lake Austin at Mary Quinlan Park on Thursday as part of its continued effort to control the rise of the invasive weed hydrilla.
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Wilmington braces for invasion by hydrilla

An invasive aquatic weed dubbed the “kudzu of the water” could make its way to Wilmington if boat owners and fishermen fail to properly clean equipment after visiting affected bodies of water.
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Hydrilla Hunt! Join the Search for a Superweed

hydrillahunt-logolowresb

Join the Search for a Superweed

Hydrilla Hunt! program solicits help of lake and river enthusiasts
to discover invasive aquatic plant

GLENCOE, Ill. (June 12, 2013) – Boaters, anglers, swimmers, and others who enjoy Illinois’ lakes and rivers are keeping their eyes peeled this summer for an aquatic “superweed.” Through the Hydrilla Hunt! program, citizen volunteers are on the lookout for a highly invasive aquatic plant named Hydrilla verticillata, or simply “hydrilla.”

Recognized as one of the world’s worst weeds, hydrilla can grow an inch per day and form dense mats of vegetation at the water surface. Within the past few years, hydrilla has been discovered in Wisconsin and Indiana and it is expected to arrive in Illinois very soon. Our desirable native aquatic plants, sport fishing, native wildlife, waterfront property values, and recreational uses might all be seriously impacted.

“Early detection of hydrilla could save Illinois millions of dollars in control costs,” noted Cathy McGlynn, coordinator for the Northeast Illinois Invasive Plant Partnership (NIIPP). “Experience from other states shows that once a waterway becomes infested with hydrilla, it’s nearly impossible to control. Our hope in Illinois is to identify the plant at a very early stage when populations are still small enough to eradicate and manage,” added McGlynn.

The strain of hydrilla that has been found in the northern United States is believed to have originated in Korea. It grows on mucky as well as sandy bottoms of lakes and rivers, and from very shallow water to depths of 20 feet or more. It can be spotted snagged on fishing lines or on boat anchors, or by noting plants seen while boating or growing along the sides of a pier. Hydrilla spreads quickly, since just a small stem fragment of hydrilla can sprout roots and grow into a whole new plant.

Anyone can participate in the Hydrilla Hunt! program. Volunteers are encouraged to take a more detailed look at aquatic plants they encounter while out and about on Illinois’ waterways. A Hydrilla Identification Sheet (available for download at the program’s website, see below) can be used to differentiate hydrilla from look-alike plants such as Brazilian elodea and American elodea. Volunteers who suspect they may have found hydrilla are asked to take several digital photographs and email them to the Hydrilla Hunt! program for verification.

For more information, including how to become a Hydrilla Hunt! volunteer, a Hydrilla Identification Sheet, fact sheets, and other resources, visit www.niipp.net/hydrilla. The Hydrilla Hunt! program is coordinated by the Northeast Illinois Invasive Plant Partnership, the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the Lake County Health Department-Lakes Management Unit. Funding support has been provided by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources through the Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant.

Download the press release

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Reed Meets With Hydrilla Task Force

Rep. Tom Reed met with the Hydrilla Task Force in Ithaca Friday to learn more about education and eradication efforts in response to the highly invasive aquatic weed in the Cayuga Inlet.
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Lake hopes county will pitch in on hydrilla

Lake Waccamaw officials took the first step to begin attacking hyrdilla, which is growing daily at Lake Waccamaw – already covering more than 600 acres of the lake. Town officials voted to appropriate $50,000 in grant match funds, contingent upon the county doing the same. READ MORE
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